Summary of 2017 Leadership Academy

January 26th – 28th, 2017

The 2017 Young Worker Leadership Academy took place January 26-28. Thirty-seven youth participated this year, including six students that returned as youth mentors. Through their participation, they learned how to plan and implement activities to promote education for youth on their workplace rights and ways to advocate for job safety. Six teams completed their community action projects, described below.

 

Centerforce Youth Court A (Oakland, CA)
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  • The team created a slideshow containing information regarding youth safety hazards and methods of reporting them.
  • The team incorporated some activities they learned in YWLA such as the safety pyramid.
  • In the future, Centerforce Youth Court A would like to present their slideshow at the California Youth Court Summit.
  • Together, they reached approximately 10 youth and 2 adults.

“If one person walks away with a better understanding of how to advocate for themselves, our goal has been accomplished.”

Centerforce Youth Court B (Oakland, CA)
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  • The team aimed to educate youth attendees about their rights as workers and did this through an informative presentation which includes scenarios.
  • In order to keep the audience engaged the team created a brochure which condensed the information from the presentation.
  • In the future, Centerforce Youth Court B would like to share their presentation by posting on social media.
  • Together, they reached approximately 10 youth and 2 adults.

“The YWLA experience was incredible. It opened my eyes to the plethora of injustices that take place within the youth labor industry. Hearing the stories that were shared between the attendees were extremely meaningful and heartwarming.”

Gridley High School (Gridley, CA)
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  • The team held an informational booth for Ag Day.
  • In order to keep the audience engaged, the team created posters and a Jeopardy game which highlighted workers’ rights, specifically in the agriculture industry.
  • Together, they reached approximately 200 youth and 20 adults.

“Always speak up about dangerous situations in the workplace. Never forget, you have a voice.”

John R Wooden High School (Reseda, CA)
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  • The team held an informational booth at Northwest Steam Fest to promote youth worker safety.
  • The booth consisted of a jeopardy game and a skit addressing issues of worker rights and safety hazards.
  • In addition, the team reached out and met with the Superintendent, counselors and principals to discuss further ideas about informing young working teens about their rights
  • Together, they reached approximately 600 youth and 800 adults.

“YWLA was a great experience for me because I learned a lot and I would like to return as a mentor to teach other teens how to work safely.”

Valley High School (Escondido, CA)
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  • The team created a presentation on safety for career day and are currently working on a safety video.
  •  In order to keep the audience engaged they created and used a jeopardy game.
  • Together, they reached approximately 25 youth and 2 adults.

“It was a great experience. If I could, I would attend next year as well. I learned so much in the workshops!”

Youth Connections (Santa Rosa, CA)
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  • The team created a video to promote the emotional safety of young workers
  • The video was promoted in presentations which lasted 30 minutes each on the campus of John Muir Charter School and Youth Connections.
  • In the future, Youth Connections hopes to reach many more by sharing their video on social media.
  • Together, they reached approximately 45 youth and 7 adults.

“I enjoyed YWLA. The workshops were interesting and helpful and the activities were educational and fun! I enjoyed getting to know people and learn about their knowledge of workers’ rights.”